View Cottages in the villages of Arran

QUICK FILTER FOR COTTAGES

Arran Villages

"The isle of Arran is made up from lots of villages dotted mostly around the coastline. Each village has its own special character, and each is well worth some further exploration. Cottages on Arran offer cottages to rent in all of these villages.
The map of Arran below shows the location of each village. Most villages run their own village halls voluntarily, with the exception of Brodick (run by the local authority) and Lamlash (which is sited within Arran High School campus) – so be sure and pop in if they have an event on!
Isle of Arran map showing villages
view of goatfell from brodick village on the isle of arran

BRODICK

Brodick is the main ferry terminal for the island and the view of the mountains as seen from the ferry as she sails into the bay is second to none. Some find Brodick busy, but after the last ferry has left a peace settles on the village and nothing can surpass the calm of a summer evening in Brodick with the sea, the beach and the mountains. MORE INFO

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

lamlash bay

LAMLASH

Lamlash has grown over the years, but the bay and view of the Holy Isle remain virtually unchanged. Shipping still seeks the shelter of its bay, yachts rest at their moorings and children swim, play, fish and mess about in boats around the harbour. The formula for an Arran holiday for many years past. MORE INFO

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

whiting bay

WHITING BAY

Whiting Bay shore has a mixture of beautiful sandy beaches and interesting rock formations, lots of seabirds and a particularly large swan population. One of the favourite walk is to Glenashdale Falls. A walk past farms and fields, along forest paths edged with ferns, mosses and lichens, and past the tumbled stones of pre-historic forts. Not a long walk but so much to see, to reflect on and to enjoy…like Arran MORE INFO

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

CORRIE

Corrie has always been a popular holiday village, from the days when the visitors were deposited on the shore at Ferry Rock to the present when they usually arrive by car via the ferry into Brodick or Lochranza. Many of the pleasures remain the same, walking along the shores or into the mountains, fishing, bird watching , and entering into the spirit of the famous “Corrie Capers”, one of Arran’s summer events. MORE INFO

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

SANNOX

The picturesque village of Sannox sits on a pale, sandy and often deserted beach on the east coast of Arran, with the dramatic Devils Punchbowl mountain as a backdrop.
‘Sand-vik’ – the sandy bay – was the name The Vikings gave to this tranquil corner of Arran. In North Glen Sannox it is possible to stand within sight of an Iron Age Fort, the tumbled remains of the village, deserted since 1829 , whose occupants emigrated to Canada, and the 1800’s farmhouse, now a trekking centre run by the McKinnon family, a name long associated with Arran. So much history, so many ghosts.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

BLACKWATERFOOT VILLAGE

BLACKWATERFOOT

Blackwaterfoot is the largest village community on the west of the island, and part of the area known as Shiskine Valley. The village is within the parish of Kilmory and is reached either from Brodick over The String Road . This is a scenic drive in either direction or take the lovely coastal route from Lochranza or Lamlash, wherever your starting point lies. You can’t get lost on Arran!

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

CATACOL

Catacol is a small village on the north west side of the island, just a few miles along the coastal road from Lochranza at the foot of Glen Catacol, a steep-sided valley. Views across to the Kintyre Peninsula. Spectacular sunsets and a perfect place for bird watchers.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

machrie standing stones

MACHRIE

Machrie is on the west end of the string road; built across the centre of Arran in 1817 by Thomas Telford.
Machrie golf course is beside the sea with fantastic views over the Kilbrannan Sound towards the Kintyre Peninsula. The 9 hole Course is ideal for golfers of all abilities & welcomes everybody, especially families. It is fairly flat, and has improved vastly in recent years. A beautiful location running alongside Machrie Beach with sea and mountain views.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

PIRNMILL VILLAGE

PIRNMILL

The name Pirnmill is not based not on Gaelic or Viking roots but is very practically named after the mill that made pirns (wooden bobbins) for Clarks (latterly Coates) of Paisley.
The mill, which was powered by a waterwheel, operated from 1780-1840 and ceased to function when the source of wood ran out Pirnmill is flanked by satellite clachans: Lenimore, Thunderguy and Auchamore to the north, and Altgolach, Whitefarland, Banliken and Imacher, to the south.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

SHISKINE

Shiskine & Blackwaterfoot form the largest village community on the west of the island, and part of the area known as Shiskine Valley. The village is within the parish of Kilmory and is reached either from Brodick over The String Road. This is a scenic drive in either direction or take the lovely coastal route from Lochranza or Lamlash, wherever your starting point lies. You can’t get lost on Arran!

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

LOCHRANZA

Lochranza is yet another lovely, peaceful Arran village, but with its own distinctive character. It has its own brand of very friendly deer, who lounge and browse on the golf course and cool themselves down in the waters of the Loch. Seals lazily sun themselves on the Newton Shore. Eagles, unmistakable in their majesty, soar high above the village, and gannets dive into the bay. There are walks into the hills, or around the coast , the new Village Hall hosts ceilidhs and concerts, Lochranza Gala Week is fun filled…and the sunsets can be spectacular.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

SLIDDERY

Sliddery (Gaelic: Slaodraidh) is a tiny hamlet located on the Southwest coast of the Isle of Arran in Scotland.
The village is situated near the Ross road between Lagg and Blackwaterfoot.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

KILMORY

Kilmory (Kilmorie) is derived from the Gaelic – Killmhuir . The district of Kilmorie stretches in the east from Craigdhu to Corriecravie in the west, the main road linking the villages of East and West Bennan, Shannochie, Lagg and Sliddery. The area has a reputation of being the home of giants.
Glen Scorrisdale is reputed to have been the home of one imaginatively nick-named Scorrie, and Ossian is supposed to have been buried at Claughaig Farm...

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

KILDONAN

The name Kildonan is derived from St. Donan, a 6th century disciple of St. Columba. St. Donan is said to be buried beside the mill wheel on Kildonan Farm, where there is also the foundation of a chapel.
Early life centered round Kildonan Castle, a square, four-storied keep. This was a Royal residence until 1405, when it was bestowed by King Robert on John Stewart of Ardgowan, later, in the 17th Century, it became part of the Hamilton estates. It is now a lonely ruin.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

LAGG HOTEL

LAGG

Lagg is a small, pretty village on southern coast of the Isle of Arran made up of a few houses and a hotel. Several beaches and Kimory village are close by. There used to be two Mills in the area, at Torrylin and Glenree., and a distillery at Lagg.
The local industry is still farming with the addition, in 1946 by The Milk Marketing Board, of the creamery at Torrylin. The cheese produced regularly wins awards and you can arrange to visit.

VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • view of goatfell from brodick village on the isle of arran

    BRODICK

    Brodick is the main ferry terminal for the island and the view of the mountains as seen from the ferry as she sails into the bay is second to none. Some find Brodick busy, but after the last ferry has left a peace settles on the village and nothing can surpass the calm of a summer evening in Brodick with the sea, the beach and the mountains. MORE INFO

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • lamlash bay

    LAMLASH

    Lamlash has grown over the years, but the bay and view of the Holy Isle remain virtually unchanged. Shipping still seeks the shelter of its bay, yachts rest at their moorings and children swim, play, fish and mess about in boats around the harbour. The formula for an Arran holiday for many years past. MORE INFO

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • whiting bay

    WHITING BAY

    Whiting Bay shore has a mixture of beautiful sandy beaches and interesting rock formations, lots of seabirds and a particularly large swan population. One of the favourite walk is to Glenashdale Falls. A walk past farms and fields, along forest paths edged with ferns, mosses and lichens, and past the tumbled stones of pre-historic forts. Not a long walk but so much to see, to reflect on and to enjoy…like Arran MORE INFO

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • CORRIE

    Corrie has always been a popular holiday village, from the days when the visitors were deposited on the shore at Ferry Rock to the present when they usually arrive by car via the ferry into Brodick or Lochranza. Many of the pleasures remain the same, walking along the shores or into the mountains, fishing, bird watching , and entering into the spirit of the famous “Corrie Capers”, one of Arran’s summer events. MORE INFO

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • SANNOX

    The picturesque village of Sannox sits on a pale, sandy and often deserted beach on the east coast of Arran, with the dramatic Devils Punchbowl mountain as a backdrop.
    ‘Sand-vik’ – the sandy bay – was the name The Vikings gave to this tranquil corner of Arran. In North Glen Sannox it is possible to stand within sight of an Iron Age Fort, the tumbled remains of the village, deserted since 1829 , whose occupants emigrated to Canada, and the 1800’s farmhouse, now a trekking centre run by the McKinnon family, a name long associated with Arran. So much history, so many ghosts.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • BLACKWATERFOOT VILLAGE

    BLACKWATERFOOT

    Blackwaterfoot is the largest village community on the west of the island, and part of the area known as Shiskine Valley. The village is within the parish of Kilmory and is reached either from Brodick over The String Road . This is a scenic drive in either direction or take the lovely coastal route from Lochranza or Lamlash, wherever your starting point lies. You can’t get lost on Arran!

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • CATACOL

    Catacol is a small village on the north west side of the island, just a few miles along the coastal road from Lochranza at the foot of Glen Catacol, a steep-sided valley. Views across to the Kintyre Peninsula. Spectacular sunsets and a perfect place for bird watchers.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • machrie standing stones

    MACHRIE

    Machrie is on the west end of the string road; built across the centre of Arran in 1817 by Thomas Telford.
    Machrie golf course is beside the sea with fantastic views over the Kilbrannan Sound towards the Kintyre Peninsula. The 9 hole Course is ideal for golfers of all abilities & welcomes everybody, especially families. It is fairly flat, and has improved vastly in recent years. A beautiful location running alongside Machrie Beach with sea and mountain views.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • PIRNMILL VILLAGE

    PIRNMILL

    The name Pirnmill is not based not on Gaelic or Viking roots but is very practically named after the mill that made pirns (wooden bobbins) for Clarks (latterly Coates) of Paisley.
    The mill, which was powered by a waterwheel, operated from 1780-1840 and ceased to function when the source of wood ran out Pirnmill is flanked by satellite clachans: Lenimore, Thunderguy and Auchamore to the north, and Altgolach, Whitefarland, Banliken and Imacher, to the south.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • SHISKINE

    Shiskine & Blackwaterfoot form the largest village community on the west of the island, and part of the area known as Shiskine Valley. The village is within the parish of Kilmory and is reached either from Brodick over The String Road. This is a scenic drive in either direction or take the lovely coastal route from Lochranza or Lamlash, wherever your starting point lies. You can’t get lost on Arran!

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • LOCHRANZA

    Lochranza is yet another lovely, peaceful Arran village, but with its own distinctive character. It has its own brand of very friendly deer, who lounge and browse on the golf course and cool themselves down in the waters of the Loch. Seals lazily sun themselves on the Newton Shore. Eagles, unmistakable in their majesty, soar high above the village, and gannets dive into the bay. There are walks into the hills, or around the coast , the new Village Hall hosts ceilidhs and concerts, Lochranza Gala Week is fun filled…and the sunsets can be spectacular.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • SLIDDERY

    Sliddery (Gaelic: Slaodraidh) is a tiny hamlet located on the Southwest coast of the Isle of Arran in Scotland.
    The village is situated near the Ross road between Lagg and Blackwaterfoot.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • KILMORY

    Kilmory (Kilmorie) is derived from the Gaelic – Killmhuir . The district of Kilmorie stretches in the east from Craigdhu to Corriecravie in the west, the main road linking the villages of East and West Bennan, Shannochie, Lagg and Sliddery. The area has a reputation of being the home of giants.
    Glen Scorrisdale is reputed to have been the home of one imaginatively nick-named Scorrie, and Ossian is supposed to have been buried at Claughaig Farm...

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • KILDONAN

    The name Kildonan is derived from St. Donan, a 6th century disciple of St. Columba. St. Donan is said to be buried beside the mill wheel on Kildonan Farm, where there is also the foundation of a chapel.
    Early life centered round Kildonan Castle, a square, four-storied keep. This was a Royal residence until 1405, when it was bestowed by King Robert on John Stewart of Ardgowan, later, in the 17th Century, it became part of the Hamilton estates. It is now a lonely ruin.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES

  • LAGG HOTEL

    LAGG

    Lagg is a small, pretty village on southern coast of the Isle of Arran made up of a few houses and a hotel. Several beaches and Kimory village are close by. There used to be two Mills in the area, at Torrylin and Glenree., and a distillery at Lagg.
    The local industry is still farming with the addition, in 1946 by The Milk Marketing Board, of the creamery at Torrylin. The cheese produced regularly wins awards and you can arrange to visit.

    VIEW AVAILABLE COTTAGES


ASSC LOGO
Visit Arran partner
Arran Estate Agents
Arran the Island
credit cards we accept